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Playing euromillions abroad

You may also find these help sections useful:

Lost and damaged tickets

If you lose your ticket or damage one to the point where it cannot be read or scanned, you should contact your National Lottery for advice on what to do next. If you have a winning ticket that has been lost or damaged you need to report it as soon as possible after the winning draw, as your claim may be invalidated if you leave it too late.

You can find the contact details for the UK and Ireland national lotteries above.

Claiming prizes

There are different ways to claim EuroMillions prizes depending on how much you win, whether your entry was bought in-store or online, and which country the ticket was bought in. Generally, smaller prizes can be claimed for lottery retailers, while larger prizes need to be redeemed from a regional office or lottery headquarters.

Go to the How to Claim page to find out all you need to know about claiming EuroMillions prizes in each participating country.

Tickets purchased in other EuroMillions countries

EuroMillions prizes can only be claimed in the same country that the winning ticket was purchased in. For example, if you buy a ticket in Spain, you will not be able to claim any prizes won on it in the UK, and vice versa.

If you do win a prize on a EuroMillions ticket bought in another country, you’ll need to contact the country’s lottery provider to find out if you can make any alternative arrangements to claim the prize — please note that this would be at the discretion of the selling lottery. Visit the dedicated page for playing EuroMillions abroad to find contact details for the lottery providers in each of the participating countries.

Identifying a lottery scam

Lottery scams are all too common today but there are two golden rules that you should remember in order to protect yourself against them:

  • You cannot win a prize in a lottery you have not entered. If you are ever notified that you have won a prize in a lottery you have not played, it is a scam.
  • No legitimate lottery organisation would demand an upfront fee to pay out your prize money. Again, any message requesting a payment to ‘release’ a lottery prize is a scam.

Go to the Scams page to learn lots more about this type of fraud, including other ways to spot lottery scams.

Что из себя представляет лотерейная игра ЕвроМиллионс?

Игра ЕвроМиллионс была организована 3-мя государствами Европы:

  • Испанией;
  • Великобританией;
  • Францией.

В течение ее лотерейной истории присоединились еще ряд стран: Ирландия, Португалия, Лихтенштейн, Австрия, Бельгия, Остров Мэн, Монако, Андорра, Люксембург.

Призовой фонд лотереи распределяется следующим образом:

  • 28 процентов учредители направляют на реализацию благотворительных программ;
  • 12 процентов выделяют в счет государства;
  • 5 процентов выплачивают в качестве комиссий реализаторам лотерейных билетов;
  • 4,5 процента расходуется учредителями на расходы по игре;
  • 0,5 учредители оставляют себе.

Нечасто в современном мире азартных развлечений можно встретить организаторов, доход которых находятся в самом низу списка раздела призового фонда и при этом составляет минимальную сумму.

Так как лотерея мировая и армия ее поклонников исчисляется сотнями тысяч, то и призовой фонд, соответственно, очень большой. Отсюда и многомиллионные призы участникам.

UK Tax Implications

While there is no tax on lottery winnings in the UK, there are a number of important considerations to keep in mind if you are lucky enough to bank a substantial amount such as a EuroMillions jackpot.

Inheritance Tax

Inheritance tax (IHT) is paid when a UK resident dies and their estate is worth more than £325,000. Everything above that threshold will be taxed at 40 percent. If you win a large EuroMillions prize and your estate exceeds the £325,000 valuation, you should be aware of the rules regarding IHT and how it will affect your heirs.

It is very common for big winners to want to share their jackpot in some way, but if you want to make a gift without paying tax you must meet one of the following criteria:

  • Give the gift more than seven years before you die.
  • Give the gift to your husband, wife, or civil partner.
  • Give less than your annual allowance of £3,000.

The seven-year rule is in place to stop people from giving money away just before they die so that they can avoid IHT. As long as you live for at least seven years after making your gift, you can give as much as you want to whoever you want without it being liable for IHT.

If you were to die within seven years, the recipient would have to pay IHT based on a sliding scale. The rate of tax is the full 40% if there are less than three years between you giving your gift and dying, and then it goes down to 32% in years three to four, 24% in years four to five, 16% in years five to six and 8% if there are between six and seven years between your gift and your death.

Any gifts made to your spouse or civil partner are exempt from IHT, so it would not matter if you died within seven years. You can also give gifts to any registered charity without being liable for tax, along with some national organisations, such as the National Trust, universities or museums.

You can also take advantage of the £3,000 ‘gift allowance’ each year without incurring IHT. If you give away more than this amount and pass away within seven years, the recipient would have to pay tax. It is possible to carry over your leftover allowance from one tax year to the next, but only up to a maximum of £6,000.

Other Tax-free Gifts

You can also give smaller gifts of up to £250 to as many people as you want without them being subject to IHT, although this would not include anyone who has already received gifts totalling the whole £3,000 annual exemption.

Wedding gifts can also be exempt from IHT, but only if they are made before the wedding and there has to be proof that the marriage does go ahead. You can make wedding gifts of up to £5,000 to a child, £2,500 to a grandchild or great-grandchild or £1,000 to anyone else. You can also make gifts to help pay the living costs of an ex-spouse, an elderly dependent or a child.

Syndicates

Lottery rules in the UK stipulate that only one person can be paid a prize, so when playing in a syndicate it is essential to have a formal agreement in place to show to tax authorities. This will prove the money was not just a gift and that everyone is entitled to their share. Anyone playing in an informal syndicate should be aware that they may have to pay inheritance tax on the full amount if the syndicate leader dies within seven years of the prize money being shared.

Tax on Interest

Most people can earn some interest from their savings without paying tax, but this might not be the case if you win a large enough EuroMillions prize. While there is no tax on the initial sum paid into your account, it may be that the win starts to produce an income through interest. This will then be taxed as part of your normal income tax.

History of The Game

My Million was first introduced on Tuesday 4th February 2014 to offer French players an extra chance of winning a prize when they played EuroMillions. The introduction of the game saw the price of a French EuroMillions ticket rise from €2 to €2.50.

To date there have been My Million numbers issued.

In September 2016, French players received another chance to win a guaranteed €1 million in special EuroMillions draws as the European Millionaire Maker game was introduced as part of changes to EuroMillions. My Million will continue to be offered to ticket holders in France alongside the new raffle.

Taxes in Other EuroMillions Countries

If you win a EuroMillions prize in Austria, Belgium, France, Ireland or Luxembourg, you will not be taxed on your winnings, just like in the UK. However, winners will be taxed in Portugal, Spain and Switzerland.

In Portugal, any prize worth more €5,000 is taxed at a rate of 20 percent, while there is a levy of 35 percent in Switzerland on any winnings over CHF1 million. Spanish prizes of more than €40,000 are subject to tax at 20 percent.

You can only claim a EuroMillions prize in the country where you bought your ticket, so you will have to accept the local rules on tax even if you are not a resident of the country.

Contact Us

For specific site or EuroMillions queries, please check out the Contact page so that we can best answer your questions.

Please do not post tickets for verification or to claim prizes as they cannot be processed at this address.

The Lottery Company Ltd
The Exchange
Station Parade
Harrogate
HG1 1TS

Scams

Unfortunately there are many scammers out there who pretend to be Euro-Millions.com. If you believe you have been sent a lottery scam, either via post, text, phone or any other method, please visit the Scams page for information on what you should do. Please note: you cannot win a prize if you have not purchased a ticket for a lottery draw.

If you have responded to a potential scam and have sent any personal/financial details, you should contact Action Fraud immediately on 0800 123 2040 or visit their website.

Meet the Team

There’s a lot of work going on behind the scenes to ensure that the website is up to date with accurate information for you. Meet the team who make it happen:

Sam Weren
Sam is our lottery expert content writer with 20+ years experience in the industry. He’s previously appeared on the BBC lottery programme and was a Lottery Guru for national newspapers including the Daily Mail.

Recent articles by Sam:

  • Systems and Strategies
  • Picking Lottery Numbers

Background:

Sam has been with us from the start providing invaluable expertise of the industry and countless cups of coffee. As a writer, Sam has a history in print publication, including the best-selling book ‘The National Lottery Book: Winning Strategies’.

Lewis Rutledge
Lewis is an experienced writer in several different areas, with an in-depth knowledge of how lotteries work.

Recent articles by Lewis:

  • UK Player Wins £79 Million EuroMillions Jackpot
  • Fourth EuroMillions Superdraw of 2020 Set for 20th November
  • Which EuroMillions Country is the Most Successful?

Background:

Lewis’ background as a sports writer helped him to gain an understanding of odds and betting strategies, before he joined the team several years ago. He prides himself on his knowledge of all things EuroMillions, even trivia about the biggest winners!

George Morley
George has worked in the lottery industry for over seven years and has an in-depth knowledge on local and foreign lotteries.

Recent articles by George:

  • £57.8M EuroMillions Jackpot Won in the UK
  • EuroMillions Prizes Changing from 1st February 2020
  • UK EuroMillions Player Wins £40 Million Jackpot

Background:

George joined Euro-Millions.com at the start of his professional career and specialises in Search Engine Optimisation. He is also certified in Google Analytics and plays a big part in day-to-day management of the site, such as running social media campaigns and being part of the results verification team.

Alex Kiam
Alex is a specialist author and money editor, who contributes his financial knowledge across the site and vets all news articles to guarantee accuracy.

Recent articles by Alex:

  • Are EuroMillions winnings taxed?
  • How to claim lottery prizes
  • How to spend £100 million

Background:

Alex Kiam is our resident financial whizz and the go-to guy for anything involving numbers. Having previously published books such as ‘Understand Financial Risk and Analysis in a Day’, Alex regularly contributes towards helpful articles on Euro-Millions.com.

Jim Coulson
Jim is a freelance content writer, blogger and voiceover who loves finding interesting stories from the world’s favourite lotteries.

Recent articles by Jim:

  • Can I Play EuroMillions and Claim Prizes in Another Country?
  • Your Big Rollover EuroMillions Questions Answered
  • Next European Millionaire Maker Draw Announced for 23rd February 2018

Background:

Jim writes articles about everything to do with EuroMillions, from information on the latest game rule changes to stories about the lottery’s biggest winners. He also provides the voiceover for some of the Euro-Millions.com videos found on this site.

Playing EuroMillions Around the World

EuroMillions is a lottery that can be played and enjoyed all around the world. Thanks to lottery concierge services like theLotter and lottery betting sites such as Jackpot.com, players from across the globe can regularly take part in EuroMillions draws.

The two systems of play allow you to win the same EuroMillions prizes, but the way in which they work differ slightly. While a lottery concierge service sees a representative purchase a ticket on your behalf, Lotto betting allows you to place a wager on the outcome of a draw. You will receive exactly the same amount of money as those playing with a physical ticket and the odds of winning remain exactly the same.

Details of how to take part in EuroMillions draws using both methods are listed below:

To play via a lottery concierge service:

  • Register an online account. This process is safe and secure.
  • Select your numbers (five from 1 to 50 and two Lucky Stars from a separate pool of 1 to 12).
  • Confirm your selection and pay for your entry.
  • A lottery representative will purchase a ticket on your behalf and save a copy of your entry in your online account.
  • Once the draw has been made, any winnings will be transferred directly into your online account.

To play via a lottery betting site:

  • Register an online account. This process is safe and secure.
  • Select your numbers (five from 1 to 50 and two Lucky Stars from a separate pool of 1 to 12).
  • Confirm your selection and pay for your entry.
  • You will receive confirmation of your bet via email.
  • Once the draw has been made, you will receive an email detailing any prizes you have won. Any winnings will be transferred to your online account.

Examples of Lottery Scams

As more and more people are becoming wise to lottery scams, fraudsters are getting increasingly creative. Here are just some examples of lottery scams you may receive:

Second Chance Lottery/Raffle

Usually based around a rollover draw, the scammer will claim you have won a prize in a ‘second chance’ EuroMillions draw. EuroMillions does not hold such ‘second chance’ draws. Unclaimed prizes are always either returned to the prize pool to pay winners in future draws or transferred to the good causes supported by the lottery.

Lottery Winner Trusts

Some scammers are using the names of known charitable lottery winners to try and extract personal information from the intended victim by claiming that the legitimate jackpot winner is looking to donate funds to people who are less fortunate or in need.

Anti Terrorism Agency

The victim receives a letter telling them there is a cheque waiting to be sent to them as soon as they pay a fee to an agency that ensures international money transfers over a certain value do not contain funds associated with terrorism.

To see an example of a scam letter received, visit the Example EuroMillions Scam page.

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